Facebook clarifies that an employee will review your photos without censorship to avoid revenge porn

It is a drama for millions of women, but there are not many ways to prevent revenge porn as long as there are still unscrupulous people willing to commit the crime. (Yes, you may not take the photo in the first place, but let’s be adults and stop blaming the victim for once).

The fact is that Facebook is trying. The company announced on Tuesday that it is working on a new tool to preemptively prevent an ex-partner or any other person from uploading the nude photos that you ever sent to your platform. It works on both Facebook and Instagram (I would not be surprised if it was also implemented in WhatsApp) and prevents the photos from being shared in public or in private.

But there is an important detail that you should know. Although we published that the process would be completely automatic, but Facebook has confirmed to the Daily Beast that, in order to block an image, an employee of the company must review an uncensored version of the same in order to verify that it fits the definition of revenge porn .

The process is as follows: First you upload the images that you fear that another person can upload to Facebook or Instagram without your permission. Then Facebook keeps the digital signature of the images and prevents another person from uploading them back to the platform.

Now, what you must understand is that, it is not a machine, but the human personnel of the company who examines the image to make sure that it is objectionable according to the terms of the service. Otherwise, someone could upload any photograph and censor it for political purposes or malicious interests.

To make matters worse, the images are not deleted from the platform but censored with a blur filter and stored in the Facebook servers where they will continue to be available “for a small number of people”. At this point, Mark Zuckerberg’s company not only puts the user on the responsibility of preventing a case of revenge porn but asks them to entrust their most intimate photos to an employee so that others never see them.

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