Alcohol consumption multiplies seven types of cancer risk

Alcohol consumption, although moderate, significantly increases the risk of developing seven types of digestive cancers, among other pathologies, according to a report prepared by European experts.

A report from the European Union of Gastroenterology (UEG) warns of the serious health risks of alcohol consumption , even moderately, and insists that the abuse of this substance is the major cause of liver cancer diagnosed in Europe, and that their intake is directly associated with seven types of digestive cancers, and also with breast cancer in women who take more than a glass of wine or beer a day.

About 60 kinds of illnesses are related to the intake of alcoholic beverages. For example, taking a couple of drinks daily containing alcohol increases the chances of developing colorectal cancer by up to 21% , and even just one a day already increases the risk of esophageal cancer . And the likelihood of pancreatic cancer is much higher in people with alcoholism and taking more than four or five drinks a day, compared to the rest of the population.

These alarming figures are those contained in the report prepared by the UEG, whose experts believe that European citizens are not aware of the dangers of alcohol consumption for health, and call for an information campaign to be launched to explain the links – scientifically tested – between alcohol abuse, especially when accompanied by tobacco consumption , and the appearance of various types of cancer, among other pathologies.

Eastern Europe, leading the way in alcohol consumption

The UEG document indicates that the European region is the one with the highest consumption of alcohol in the world, the average being two drinks a day and, within Europe, the countries that top the list of major drinkers are Lithuania (18 liter of pure alcohol per person per year), Czech Republic, Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia. In fact, according to data handled by the UEG, in Eastern Europe the risk of dying from causes associated with alcohol intake is seven times higher than in the Mediterranean area.

Therefore, as explained by Paul Fockens, the next president of the UEG, it is of vital importance that in Europe there is a change of attitude regarding alcohol consumption and measures are taken to prevent this addiction , since the social and health consequences are immense.

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